As of August 18, fish farm disease is on the Cohen Commission stand and you can expect tons of news on this subject. (Do check below for a very interesting list of weblinks. Copy and paste them into Google).

In one dense paragraph, some subjects in these evidentiary hearings are: the Province and the Feds have no mandatory ISA test; the industry refused to forward some testing results; science’s greatest tool, the Precautionary Principle, has disappeared from DFO; DFO’s Wild Salmon Policy has disappeared, too; the Fisheries Act’s 148 year old pollution clauses were rendered toothless by new, easier-on-fish-farm regulations; there are dozens of salmon virus and bacterial diseases – not simply ISA (from Norway’s Atlantic); IHN and SLV, are natural, Pacific diseases using fish farms as vectors; and, the muzzled DFO scientist Kristi Miller and her revolutionary ‘viral signature’ salmon killer. The Privy Council Office’s muzzling her from media has lead to more articles in the western world’s press on fish farm diseases than any subject in all my years of reading.

The schedule of witnesses is at: http://www.cohencommission.ca/en/Schedule/. Check my catchsalmonbc.com for more links.

And about Grant Warkentin’s TC Letters question (Mainstream’s Communications Officer): do we stop importing bananas because they may have spiders, I say: Grant knows better. It was Cermaq who did the ISA research proving vertical transmission in eggs from Norway to Chile where it wiped out 70% of the 800 farms resulting in a $2 billion loss. Some Chileans are considering suing the Norwegian derivatives. Who would we sue?

Just so you know, Chile used 350 times more antibiotics than Norway during the crisis. In Norway they finally put their fish in peroxide because antibiotics do not work on viral mutants. Would you eat these products?

After sustaining body blow damage in Chile, Marine Harvest shares have plummeted in unabated free fall the past two years to the almost deadly range of $.49 last Friday. In short: the western world has moved on from these technological dinosaurs to demand on-land, closed systems for non-wild salmon.

Just so you know: Cermaq, senior to Mainstream Canada, is controlled by the Norwegian government’s 43.5% share, and thus the taxpayers of Norway. It’s in essence like a government ministry here, with CEO Geir Isaksen leaving the sinking ship before Cohen. He’s taken the head of that country’s rail transportation ‘ministry’. Can Canada sue Norway?

Viruses mutate so fast there are 20 new strains in Chile. Mainstream inadvertently put its multi-national minutes on the internet. So the Norwegian derivatives rolled forward their optics/legal strategy from that post saying they take great pride in the research – I’m not sure why – to saying the research does not allow for pin-pointing the finger at any particular Norwegian company. Six Broughton Archipelago First Nations are already taking the feds to court here, and BC has one third of all the First Nations in Canada, most on the Fraser – the reason being, yes, abundant sockeye salmon.

Dr. John Volpe scientist from U. Vic. said in a message screened to an audience including Cermaq in 2007: “If you bring this number of potential hosts together you will have disease problems… Industrial-scale salmon farming in British Columbia equals the extinction of wild salmon, which then means the extinction of our wild ecosystem, and it’s going to happen in the next decade”. Sadly, I believe him. Testimony will be riveting. Disease is only one problem.

560 Words

dcreid@catchsalmonbc.com

Wild Salmon Protected by No One – Weblinks

Here are some weblinks if you wish to follow up information in my On Fishing column in the Times Colonist newspaper this week.

1. Mainstream’s minutes on the internet:
http://alexandramorton.typepad.com/alexandra_morton/2011/07/cermaq-corporate-team-minutes-be-careful.html.

2. Mainstream’s first optics communication after its minutes were taken off the internet: http://www.mainstreamcanada.com/real-isa-situation-bc-mainstream-canada.

3. Cermaq’s research on ISA in Chile and Norway: http://www.cermaq.com/portal/wps/wcm/connect/0a6b9c8046d6bd2d81ddf38618b29640/Fiskehelse+b%C3%A6rekraft+270411+SVI+til+web.pdf?MOD=AJPERES

4. Another paper on the Chile ISA problem from Archives of Virology: http://www.springerlink.com/content/f542865267853111/. From the paper: “Norway exports large amounts of Atlantic salmon embryos every year to Chile; hence, the best explanation for the Norwegian ISA virus in Chile is transmission via these embryos, i.e. ‘vertical or transgenerational transmission’.”

5. Chief Bob Chamberlain speaking on behalf of six First Nations in their lawsuit against the federal government: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Ojey_GYsbi0. Here is another video with Chamberlain on the subject: http://thecanadian.org/k2/item/896-video-musgamagw-unite-in-response-to-marine-harvest-breach.

6. A quote from Professor Are Nylund, head of the Fish Diseases Group at the University of Bergen, Norway on transfer of disease from the Atlantic to BC.: “… based on 20 years of experience, I can guarantee that if British Columbia continues to import salmon eggs from the eastern Atlantic infectious salmon diseases, such as ISA, will arrive in Western Canada. Here in Hardangerfjord we have sacrificed our wild salmon stocks in exchange for farm salmon. With all your 5 species of wild salmon, BC is the last place you should have salmon farms.” See: http://newsletter.vitalchoice.com/e_article001450292.cfm?x=bfDcRpD,b7b1jv7h,w

7. Scott Hinch, an investigator at the University of British Columbia’s Pacific salmon ecology and conservation lab and a co-author of a study on salmon published in Science. He testified before the panel last month, saying the virus could be the biggest factor that’s driving the sockeye collapse. See: http://www.physorg.com/news/2011-04-pacific-salmon-dying-leukemia-type-virus.html.

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